Ireland votes Yes

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The Republic of Ireland has voted decisively to overturn the result of the June 2008 referendum on the Lisbon Treaty, with a 20% swing to ‘yes’ producing a two-thirds majority for the ‘yes’ side.

The Lisbon treaty, which updates the structures of the European Union, required approval by referendum for Ireland to ratify, and the treaty could not come into force without all member states ratifying. The June 2008 referendum saw a 53% vote against the treaty. Pressure from Europe and the continuing support of Ireland’s major parties saw Lisbon remain on the agenda, and Ireland’s economic collapse in late 2008 saw support for the treaty increase markedly.

Yesterday’s referendum produced a result of 67% in favour of the treaty, a swing of 20.5% on the previous referendum. While only ten of Ireland’s 43 constituencies voted ‘yes’ in 2008, all but two voted ‘yes’ yesterday. The two remaining constituencies, Donegal North East and Donegal South West, saw the smallest swings towards ‘yes’ (only about 13% each), while all other constituencie produced swings from 16% to 22%, indicating a remarkable consistency in the shift in favour of the Lisbon treaty.

In addition, there was an increase in turnout from about 53% to 58%, and a 5% increase in turnout was fairly consistent across the country.

I have created maps showing results and turnout levels for the two referendums, and posted them below the fold. Remember, you can download the Google Earth maps of both current Irish constituencies and proposed constituencies for the next election from the Tally Room maps page.

2008 referendum results. Green indicates a Yes vote, Pink/Red indicates a No vote of varying levels of intensity. Pink areas voted No by less than 60%, Red areas more than 60%.
2008 referendum results. Green indicates a Yes vote, Pink/Red indicates a No vote of varying levels of intensity. Pink areas voted No by less than 60%, Red areas more than 60%.
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2009 referendum results. Green indicates a Yes vote, Pink indicates a No vote. Darker shades of green indicates a higher Yes vote.
2008 referendum turnout levels. Light blue indicates under 50% turnout, darker shades indicate higher turnout.
2008 referendum turnout levels. Light blue indicates under 50% turnout, darker shades indicate higher turnout.
2009 referendum turnout levels. Light blue indicates under 50% turnout, darker shades indicate higher turnout.
2009 referendum turnout levels. Light blue indicates under 50% turnout, darker shades indicate higher turnout.
2008 referendum results in Dublin.
2008 referendum results in Dublin.
2009 referendum results in Dublin.
2009 referendum results in Dublin.
2008 referendum turnout levels in Dublin.
2008 referendum turnout levels in Dublin.
2009 referendum turnout levels in Dublin.
2009 referendum turnout levels in Dublin.
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5 COMMENTS

  1. Interesting that they had a second ballot less than 2 years after the first. And then there’s the next round of EU balloting in the Czech republic.

    But I was also wondering, Ben, if you’d be doing anything on the Greek elections, which I understand are on today/tonight.

  2. Well, in case anyone is interested, PASOK won a convincing victory with 44% of the vote and 160 of the 300 seats, beating the centre right New Democracy party & incumbent Prime Minister Karamanlis. The Greens scored 2.5%, which isn’t enought to win seats 93% threshold) and down on their 3.5% at the European elections. However 2 other “Green” parties (Greek Ecologists & Ecologists Greece) featured in the elections, Greek Ecologists because they are looney fringe party with semi-naked women on their posters, and Ecologists Greece because of the their alliance with the far-right LAOS. Neither of these parties are recognised as Green parties by the European Greens, but GE scored 0.3% of the vote to potentially bring down the Greens vote:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_legislative_election,_2009

  3. Some good news for Sinn Fein in that their Donegal heartland held true to their cause and voted no.

Comments are closed.